The Garden of Nations: Where cultures converge

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The Garden of Nations: Where cultures converge

The Garden of Nations was established on a 2200 m2 land in Al-Masyoun area opposite to Aziz Shahin Square. This garden is a public park that symbolizes friendship and solidarity between all peoples through the areas and sculptures spread in special and numerous spaces representing the cultures of different peoples.

The “Path of Friendship and Peace” divides the garden into several areas assuming the shape of a heart to create an atmosphere of excitement and love for the visitors. The garden provides a beautiful location for children to play, an appropriate place for youth to stroll, and a quiet place for the elderly who wish to relax amidst a green area. Additionally, there is an open yard used for celebrations, plays and different arts exhibitions. People may also sit on the amphitheater or on the green hill in the garden.

The garden was mainly established to promote understanding, exchange of knowledge and relations between peoples. It can be considered an “open museum” to get introduced to the cultures and arts of other peoples, thus creating arts bridges and promoting arts ties as well.

Countries that wished to open their space either sent a sculpture or artistic work from their country, sent an artist to create his art in Palestine, or sent designs where coordination was done with local creative artists to implement the sculpture.

The garden includes several facilities that facilitate the public’s visits; it includes a services and security structure, as well as a cafeteria and an open yard used for parties, plays and different arts exhibitions. People may also sit on the amphitheater or on the green hill in the garden which was created from debris that was covered by a layer of grass.

Several countries opened their spaces in the garden including: Australia, Brazil, China, India, Malta, Poland, Spain, Norway, Sri Lanka, Paris, and Trondheim. This project started in cooperation with Trondheim municipality that provided the general design for the garden. Countries and representative offices were then encouraged to have their own corners in the park through providing them with open invitations and allocating space for them to implement their work.